5Rights Youth Juries


About this resource

  • It was developed for and with educators
  • It is licensed with Creative Commons (CC BY 4.0) so you can use as little or as much as you like; and, you can adapt and change anything. If you publish a remixed version, which you are welcome to do, we do ask for attribution - that's all!
  • You are encouraged to make adaptations
  • If you use this framework or the resources, we would love to share your work to help inspire other educators

Purpose/Goals of 5Rights Youth Juries

There are not strict learning "objectives" for the juries, but they aim for young people to:

  • Understand the 5Rights
  • Have engaged in and steered a deliberative conversation around their digital rights, drawing on their own experiences
  • Have engaged in designing their own recommendations/scenarios/campaigns to raise awareness

Check out the iRights project video from previous juries


5Rights Youth Jury Framework

Click on the image to see in full

The Youth Juries is underpinned by this framework:

  1. Stimulus —> Present one of the dramatised scenarios, or another stimulus of your choosing (this could be an article, for example)
  2. Deliberate —> Discuss the stimulus themes as a group, drawing on personal experience
  3. Design —> In smaller groups, design recommendations/ campaigns/ scenarios that could raise awareness of 5Rights, awareness of issues or potential solutions.

You can read the full report on the first juries here


Jury fundamentals

  • Brush up on your understanding of 5Rights
  • Juries have worked best with groups of 10-15 participants
    • you can divide larger groups up, but there should be a facilitator for each group
  • You should only need one facilitator per 10-15 participants
  • Juries have lasted around 2 hours
    • You can split them up over several sittings
    • You can pick and choose which 5Rights you want to discuss
  • Video scenarios [stimulus] of the 5Rights are downloadable for use offline
  • Create a relaxed environment, encourage participation from all young people.

Here is an animated overview of the 5Rights:


Step-by-step: Introducing the Jury

  • Introduce yourself (if necessary)
  • Let’s break the ice!
    • Ask your group to think about whether there are any apps, websites or games that they can’t live without, what are they and why*
    • Say what your favourite app is and why
    • Go round the room, asking the young people to introduce themselves (if you don’t know them already) and share what they can’t live without.
  • To warm things up show "What is the Internet" video-scenario
  • Introduce how the jury is going to work
    • You are going to watch scenarios based on the different 5Rights
    • We are going to talk about the scenarios and draw on our own experiences
    • We are going to design recommendations/campaigns/scenarios that could raise awareness of 5Rights, awareness of issues or potential solutions.
  • Ask young people - what do you think a jury is?
    In the legal system a jury is a group of citizens who come together to discuss, deliberate and come to conclusion, that influences the court decision about whether somebody is guilty or innocent.
    We want you guys to be a group of people here who are discussing, debating and deliberating on some key issues, and then coming to some conclusions and putting forward some recommendations and proposals as a result of discussions. And we really want you to think about this jury as an opportunity for you to influence the future of the internet.
  • Ask young people - what are rights?
    Something that you should have and no one would take away from you. They’re sort of intrinsic or defendable and they should exist for everyone sort of thing. So we want to talk to you about internet rights. Now, these exist partly in the form of a number of rights which have been talked about by experts and are being used by this campaign, called 5Rights, but in some ways they don’t really exist at all, because they’re not currently necessarily a part of law.
  • Move onto one of the scenarios

*You can come back to this ice-breaker question in The Right to Know

Click here for more details


The 5Rights scenarios and guidelines

You can pick and choose which rights you would like to explore in whatever order you like.


The Right to Know

  • Introduce the video
  • Play the video [Stimulus]
  • Host a discussion about the scenario, themes and draw from personal experiences [deliberate]
  • You can ask questions such as:
    • How many of you have shopped online?
    • Have you noticed adverts appearing in other places?
    • How do you feel about companies storing and sharing your information?
    • Do you read the Terms and Conditions of websites?
    • Do you understand them? *
  • Form smaller groups to design recommendations for government/internet companies; awareness campaigns of issues/solutions to peers etc. [design]
    • This can be done using flipchart paper to scatter ideas
  • Each group should share their best/favourite idea with the rest of the group.

Click here for more details

* Here, why not ask the young people to search for the privacy policy of their favourite app/website/game they shared in the beginning and find out what information is stored and shared. How clear are the companies when explaining how information is going to be used and who else they will be shared with?


The Right to Remove

  • Introduce the video, that is framed as a game show
    • Ask the young people to think about who they would choose to have their data removed any why.
  • Play the video [Stimulus]
  • Host a discussion in response to the scenario, themes and personal experiences [Deliberate]
  • You can ask questions such as:
    • Who do you think should have their data removed any why?
    • Do you think that a person’s past is important and should remain public?
    • Do you know how to remove content?
    • Do you feel confident asking a friend to remove content (a post, picture or video) about you?
  • Formulate smaller groups to design recommendations for government/internet companies; awareness campaigns of issues/solutions to peers etc. [Design]
    • This can be done using flipchart paper to scatter ideas
  • Each group should share their best/favourite idea with the rest of the group.

Click here for more details


The Right to Safety and Support

  • Introduce the video
  • Play the video [Stimulus]
  • Host a discussion in response [Deliberate]
  • You can ask questions such as:
    • Have any of you felt similarly to how the main character does here?
    • How do you feel about the ‘friend’ who posts a lot about the charity work? Have you ever felt guilty?
    • And how about the ‘friend’ who posts when there is a big argument? Is this threatening? What would you do in that situation?
    • If you saw something illegal happening online, what would you do?
  • Formulate smaller groups to design recommendations for government/internet companies; awareness campaigns of issues/solutions to peers etc. [Design]
    • This can be done using flipchart paper to scatter ideas
  • Each group should share their best/favourite idea with the rest of the group.

Click here for more details


The Right to Informed and Conscious Use

  • Introduce the video
  • Play the video [Stimulus]
  • Host a discussion in response to the scenario and right, allow young people to draw from pesonal experience [Deliberate]
  • You can ask questions such as:
    • Is this familiar for any of you?
    • How do you feel when you get a notification?
    • Do you ever take time ‘off’? What kind of things do you do to help?
    • How many things do you have ‘push’ notifications for? Do you know how to stop them?
  • Formulate smaller groups to design recommendations for government/internet companies; awareness campaigns of issues/solutions to peers etc. [Design]
    • This can be done using flipchart paper to scatter ideas
  • Each group should share their best/favourite idea with the rest of the group.

Click here for more details


The Right to Digital Literacy

In previous juries the Right to Digital Literacy asks young people to create their own scenarios to illustrate how they want to learn about how the digital world works, what they want to know, and how best to share digital content.

Alternatively, drawing on contemporary issues around alternative truths or ‘fake news’ why not try this lesson plan on identifying satire as fake news.